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General Electricals: GE Renewable Energy selects Mammoet to supply onshore heavy lifting and transport for Dogger Bank Wind Farm

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GE Renewable Energy announced today that it has selected Mammoet UK, based in Thornaby Teesside, to supply onshore heavy lifting and transport for the staging and assembly of turbine components for the Dogger Bank Wind Farm. Dogger Bank Wind Farm is a joint venture between SSE Renewables, Equinor and Vårgrønn.

Mammoet will employ multiple lifting and transport crews for simultaneous operations to support with the loading of equipment and tower assembly in the marshalling harbor, a key piece in constructing the project. The team will utilize cranes and self-propelled modular transporter (SPMT) axles at Able Seaton Port, the Dogger Bank Wind Farm marshalling harbor.

GE will start preparing the marshalling harbor and receiving components at the end of 2022.

Nathan Fahey, GE Project Director for the Dogger Bank Wind Farm, said, “We are delighted to announce that we have selected Mammoet UK as our cranes and logistics supplier for the Dogger Bank Wind Farm. The cranes and associated equipment the company will provide and operate for us will be essential to the smooth operation of our marshalling harbor on Teesside, where 277 sets of blades, nacelles and towers of our Haliade-X wind turbines will be erected and transit over the course of the project. We believe Mammoet has the right expertise and equipment to be an excellent partner for us.”

Darren Adams, Mammoet’s Group Commercial Officer, said, “Mammoet is delighted to work in close partnership with GE to help build the world’s largest offshore wind farm. The project is a large step towards a net-zero future, delivering a boost for the local economy and wider 2030 and 2050 emissions targets. By utilizing Mammoet’s strong presence in the UK, headquartered from Teesside, backed up by its network of international engineering hubs, we will enable the delivery of clean, cost-efficient energy to around six million homes.”

Simon Bailey, Commercial Director for Dogger Bank Wind Farm, said: “We’re delighted to see another company from the north-east of England winning valuable contracts in our supply chain and playing a significant role in the construction of the world’s largest offshore wind farm. We look forward to working with GE and Mammoet on achieving this exciting milestone at Able Seaton.”

GE Renewable Energy announced in May 2021 that it had finalized all supply contracts for the 3.6 GW Dogger Bank Offshore Wind Farm, due to become the largest offshore wind farm in the world upon completion.

Dogger Bank Wind Farm is located over 130 km off the north-east coast of England and each phase will be able to produce 6TWh of renewable electricity, totaling 18TWh annually, when complete in 2026 – equivalent to powering approximately the equivalent of six million UK homes each year or around 5% of the UK’s electricity demand. Due to its size and scale, the site is being built in three consecutive phases: Dogger Bank A, Dogger Bank B and Dogger Bank C.

Mammoet UK’s headquarters in Teesside sits on a six-acre site located just 12 miles from the project and employs over 180 full-time employees. The facility consists of offices, storage, workshop space and testing areas. Mammoet has also established an academy on the site, where it plans to train additional crews as part of the resourcing plan. This local presence is critical to the success of the project.

“This contract represents not just a win for Mammoet and renewable energy investment but for the people of Teesside,” said UK Managing Director, Mark Sadler. “Securing the project means even greater potential investment and business growth that will expand our existing pool of highly skilled labor with renewables expertise in the region. We have a great opportunity to support GE Renewables and other businesses building the UK’s fast-growing offshore wind energy market.”

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